If you’re female, out of college, great at soccer, and your name isn’t Mia Hamm, you didn’t have a lot of options to pursue a financially stable career as a profesional athlete before 2009. That’s the year Women’s Professional Soccer was established. It’s the league at the top of the US Women’s Soccer Pyramid with six actives teams all on or near the Easter seaboard (in George, Massachusetts, Florida, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and New York) and average player salaries of at least $32,000 a year.

That’s not a ton of cash, but a decent wage for seven months a year worth of playing a game you presumably very much enjoy. Plus, players have the opportunity to make money on the side through marketing and appearances. Players like Amy Rodriguez of the Philadelphia Independence, Alex Scott of the Boston Breakers, Karina LeBlanc of the Philadelphia Independence, and Marta (she’s Brazilian so she only has one name) of the Western New York Flash, all of whom star in Alloy Digital’s latest original web series.

My Day, My Life: Women’s Soccer documents days in the lives of the four athletes as they get ready to play for their nations’ teams in Germany for the 2011 FIFA Women’s World Cup. There’s beautiful football action shots set to an inspirational score and inserted between interview footage, where the soccer stars talk about their routine and love of the game.

Puma is the lead sponsor of the series, which features products from the brands Women’s Soccer Training line throughout. The show is distributed on Alloy Digital network sites, including Gurl.com, Teen.com, Takkle.com, and ChannelOne.com, and a handful of exclusive partner sites, like ClevverTV, IMVU, Smosh, and Meez.

Alloy is good at reaching the younger girl demo to which Puma is obviously trying to appeal. The company ranks Gossip Girl and Pretty Little Liars amongst its top properties and reaches a total audience of 73 million teens every month.