A relatively minor player in the multi-channel network industry has partnered with two of YouTube’s most prominent gamers. SeaNanners and The Syndicate Project, both of whom previously plied their trades on the Machinima network, have now both switched over to Omnia Media, an MCN that was (until now) focused mainly on musical creators.

With a combined 8.9 million YouTube subscribers, Syndicate and SeaNanners were respectively the fourth and sixth most-subscribed Machinima partners. In September 2013, the videos on their channels were watched more than 80.9 million times (45.7 million for SeaNanners and 35.2 million for Syndicate). SeaNanners and Syndicate have also amassed a collective 1.6 billion views during their tenors on YouTube, mostly by sharing their video game adventures with the Call of Duty series serving as a particularly popular choice for both of them.

Their choice to transition to Omnia is an unusual one. Omnia is not one of the Top 10 YouTube Multi-Channel Networks in terms of subscribers or views, and its presence on the online video sharing site is mostly centered around musicians like Inna, Tyga, and Talib Kweli. While it does have some non-musical creators within its network (such as frequent Sam Pepper collaborator Mazzi Maz), Omnia’s two new partnerships are on an audience and subscriber level that’s far above any of its other channels. Syndicate and SeaNanners will now become the two most popular creators on the network by a wide margin.

It’s probable that Omnia made its two new clients an offer they couldn’t refuse in the form of better ad rates, more sponsor deals, and more personalized customer service and managment, but no matter the reason for their exodus from Machinima, the gaming-heavy MCN has no hard feelings for its former partners. “It’s been a blast working with Syndicate and Seananners to grow their audiences,” said a Machinima representative. ”We have been part of each other’s growth story since the beginning, and we wish them both the absolute best and look forward to future collaborations.”