Web series and web video bits from around the internets worth clicking today:


Ella Morton
Rocketboom correspondent Ella Morton launched a new web series this week, The Elegant Guide, with light hearted style and etiquette tips from the graceful and dare we say, elegant British native. [TheElegantGuide.com]

Taryn Southern has a new live web chat show on Ustream: The Taryn Ten at 10pm EST every Tuesday. After a few experimental preview eps, the series begins 2010 tonight with guest Jaime King (Sin City, My Bloody Valentine) joining Southern. For now the series shoots via web cam in Southern’s home, but future weekly episodes will head to a 3-camera studio. [TarynSouthern.com]

The Beautiful Life, the cancelled CW show from Ashton Kutcher’s Katalyst Media that found a second life on YouTube—with new sponsor HP on board—has been doing better online than it had on TV according to new numbers reported today by CNN. 2.7 million people have watch the five episodes online so far, compared to just 2.5 million on the CW. “I want this to be the first show ever that gets more viewers on the Web than it did on terrestrial television,” said Kutcher said in a recent video on YouTube. Kutcher and company are now exploring options to keep the series alive with new episodes as an online-only show. [CNN.com]

RISE a new daily “non-boring web show for entrepreneurs and marketers” from St. Louis-based creator and host David Siteman Garland launched this week packing reviews, tips, whiteboard sessions—and sponsor shoutouts—into tightly cut three minute episodes. So far it’s content rich and living up to its tagline: “If you want fluff, go pet a bunny.” [therisetothetop.com]

Slate TV has a gem of an animated editorial cartoon from Mark Fiore that takes “an amusing look back at what we did and didn’t accomplish in 2009.” [Slate TV]

Who Will Win the Cable Wars? Speaking of Slate, they also have a nice recap of the recent Cable TV wars which have been heating up lately with the Time Warner spat with FOX and Scripps pull out of Cablevision. Daniel Gross outlines the motives and possible outcomes for this melee, which has some very real collateral effects on web television industry. “Broadcast and cable television face serious challenges. Younger people are spending more time online than they do in front of the tube. Internet advertising is much cheaper than TV advertising. Production costs are high. And the DVR allows people to skip ads. Many of the same digerati who in the 1990s proclaimed online media would kill print media now prophesy that YouTube will kill network television.” [Slate.com]

MeFeedia released its State of the Vlogosphere today, noting that 70% of vloggers are using the 5 video host sites, with (not surprise here) YouTube taking top dog with 36% of all vlogs. Blip.tv, Vimeo, MySpace and Dailymotion rounded out the list. Also notable is that international vlog numbers are growing faster than the U.S., with Spanish-language video blogs the fastest grower. [TechCrunch]

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