Where do serial killers come from? Do we blame the parents? It’s an easy enough excuse for me. Crazy adults breed crazy children.

Remember that one kid who would eat anything for a nickle – worms, live moths, puke from the third grader who got sick after lunch while playing in the tractor tire out on the playground. At my school that kid’s name was Willie. Willie’s father hung out in prison a lot. I’m guessing Willie’s still got some issues and I point the finger at Dad.

But then you got that kid who comes from about as close to a Beaver Cleaver family as there could be.  Wonder Bread all the way. And what does that kid do? He murders his whole family and his pulse never goes above 60. Got to be a genetic defect there right?

Then you watch a show like the Mr. Men Show, a 70’s, 80’s, and 90’s British cartoon for kids and you begin to wonder. I mean really, Mr. Men, Teletubbies, Barney and Friends, Little Einstein, I Spit on Your Grave, those are some pretty twisted little numbers that everyone’s used to raise their little ones.  It’s f-d up I’m telling you and there’s got to be consequences.

Enter Steven Cerritos’ of Enity Films little NSFW psychotic wonder, Mr. Serial Killer.

The show starts off playing homage to the Mr. Men Show with a cartoon narrated by soothing, sing songy Brit with lots of happy words: “Everybody who lives in Happyville is as happy as happy can be.  Wherever you go you will find happy men, happy women and even happy babies.” Then we’re introduced to The Happy Faced Killer. And the happy faced killer does what other killers do. He kills. Lots of blood and F-bombs here folks so hide the chillens.

The show segues from its animated intro into a live action sequence. In the premier episode we meet a group of men who are introducing themselves to one another with the hopes that they’ll be involved in a bdsm beauty’s bukkakke gang bang. Again, hide the chillens. Unfortunately these men don’t get to live out their twisted fantasies because of someone’s psychotic tendancies.

Cerritos explains his methodology:

“We’ve taken the unique approach of delivering the web seires on a platform with a colorful, cartoonlike art direction because it offers the creators numerous creative possibilites and it lightes the live action’s dark twisted themes. It also creates for effective contrast when juxtaposing the vibrant, and lightheared cartoon sequences to the gritty, dark and violent live action.”

The show is well produced and abley acted. I especially liked Doug Millar who plays the part of Wilfredo Cromwell, a schizophrenic Scottsman with little weinie issues.

The first episode runs a bit long, just over 20 minutes, but we’re promised that subsiquent episodes will hover more closely around the web standardized 5 to 10 minutes.  The new episodes will still follow the original format with a cartoon sequence bringing us into live action along with a miniseries serial drama element running throughout the series.

So back to my original question, where do serieal killers come from?  Again, Cerritos:

“Well, where’s the substance? Is this just the equivalent to torture porn? Yes. Yes it is! Hahaha! All kidding aside, there’s more to this than just violence and mere shock value. The 70’s gave us Bundy and Gacy. The 80’s had its Dahmer’s and Ramirez’, while the 90’s had its Wuornos’ and Bernardo’s.

Every individual serial killer is a direct reflection of what had gone wrong in their society. You see, the serial killer is a modern day cultural phenomenon. As society evolves, so does the serial killer. In many ways, they’re the byproduct of our forefathers’ sins, of their negligence, of their ineptitude, of their ignorance…Today, when greed and gluttony has run amok, when anarchy and nihilism distort our perception on progression, what kind of monster will society deliver to us?  Stay tuned…”

I still blame the parents.

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